Archive for November, 2017

http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/136/Suppl_1/A14752

Conclusions: Our study showed that cannabis use lowered the odds of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure. There was also reduced in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for the primary diagnosis of heart failure in DU and NDU which was not explained by comorbid conditions and demographic data. This study provides important opportunity to explore the preventive mechanism of cannabis on atrial fibrillation and its therapeutic potential in heart failure patients.

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Marijuana Use for HeartBergenfield, NJ: Heart failure patients with a history of cannabis use possess reduced odds of in-hospital mortality compared to similarly matched controls, according to data published online in the journal Circulation.

Investigators assessed data from over six million heart failure patients over a seven-year period. Patients with a history of cannabis use were less likely to suffer from atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), experienced shorter hospital stays, and were less likely to die during hospitalization as compared to non-users.

“Our study showed that cannabis use lowered the odds of atrial fibrillation in patients with heart failure,” authors concluded. “There was also reduced in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for the primary diagnosis of heart failure in DU (cannabis dependent users) and NDU (non-dependent cannabis users) which was not explained by comorbid conditions and demographic data. This study provides important opportunity to explore the preventive mechanism of cannabis on atrial fibrillation and its therapeutic potential in heart failure patients.”

Prior studies have similarly reported increased survival rates among marijuana-positive patients hospitalized for traumaTBI (traumatic brain injury), and heart attacks.

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “Among patients with heart failure, cannabis is associated with reduced occurrence of atrial fibrillation and in-hospital mortality: Evidence from the Nationwide Survey 2007-2014.”

Survey: Many Medical Cannabis Patients Cease Using Opioids

Thursday, 16 November 2017

Medical Marijuana Less OpioidsChicago, IL: More than two out of three medical marijuana patients substitute cannabis in place of opioids, according to survey data compiled by Aclara Research, a Chicago-based consulting firm.

Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported that they ceased their opioid use after initiating cannabis therapy. Twenty-nine percent of respondents said that cannabis allowed them to decrease their use of opioids.

The findings are similar to those of prior surveys concluding that patients who use cannabis therapeutically typically reduce or cease their use of opioids and other prescription pharmaceuticals.

According to an October 21 academic paper published on SSRN.com, the enactment of medical marijuana access laws is associated with a $2.47 decrease in per person prescribed opioid spending among those between the ages of 18 and 39. Previous studies – such as those herehere, and here – have drawn similar conclusions.

On November 1, members of President Trump’s opioid commission rejected the notion that cannabis access is associated with reduced rates of opioid abuse and mortality. By contrast, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse acknowledges that available studies “cumulatively suggest that medical marijuana products may have a role in reducing the use of opioids.”

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.

Study: Oral THC Mitigates Symptoms Of Sleep Apnea

Thursday, 16 November 2017

THC and Sleep ApneaChicago, IL: The use of oral THC mitigates sleep apnea symptoms compared to placebo, according to clinical trial data published online ahead of print in the journal Sleep.

Investigators at the University of Illinois at Chicago assessed the efficacy of dronabinol treatment in 73 adults diagnosed with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). They reported that oral THC administration prior to bedtime reduced symptom severity and improved subjective sleepiness.

The results of a prior clinical trial in 2013 similarly reported, “Dronabinol treatment may be a viable alternative or adjunctive therapy in selected patients with OSA.”

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.orgFull text of the study, “Pharmacotherapy of apnea by cannabimimetric enhancement, the PACE clinical trial: effects of dronabinol on obstructive sleep apnea,” appears in Sleep.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171113123639.htm

Reading this would lead a naive reader to be horrified at the implications.  But, consider:  If the sky didn’t fall with 16% daily cannabis use, why would it at 19%?  What percentage use alcohol daily?  Caffeine?  It’s all in the BFD category– useless studies, useless results, useless consequences.

And what about people using it to medicate– perhaps in lieu of opiates.  Is that a bad thing?  Is it worse than a couple of beers or glasses of wine?

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171106121300.htm

When cannabinoids activate signaling pathways in cancer cells they can stimulate a cell death mechanism called apoptosis, unleashing a potent anti-tumor effect.

And the parent article cited:

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/acm.2017.0016

Rick Simpson was one of the first to identify cannabis’ anti-cancer properties anecdotally.  The regimen he touted was to ingest as much cannabis as possible, ramping up as tolerance increases.  He used concentrated cannabis oil to treat himself and others.

It is important to note that smoking it does not get enough of the cannabinoids into the body; it must be orally ingested.  Searching for Rick Simpson will find his regimen and commentary.

AuntieBS

Booze and pot use in teens lessens life success

University of Connecticut apparently doesn’t understand the difference between correlation and causality.  They assert that alcohol and pot use in teens lessens live success, but have they considered that maybe these teens would have had less success whether or not they indulged in intoxicants?  Have they considered whether or not these teens in the study may have gravitated to alcohol and pot because of lower IQs, poor study habits, socio-economic conditions, poor parenting, or any of several other factors that may be causal to both getting high and poor success in life?

Sadly, this sort of “study” disparages science and is a detriment to the entire field, leading to the public ignoring warnings, quality studies, and the repetition of mistakes in life.

BULLSHIT!

 

AuntieBS