Archive for the ‘Bad Science’ Category

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180424160233.htm

I have long been an advocate of a direct test for coordination, judgment, and reaction time, instead of the current cannabis metabolite test being used in some areas to determine whether or not a driver is stoned.  The problem with this test is that cannabis metabolites can remain in a person’s blood for a month after usage has stopped, and is a very poor indicator of the driver’s state of mind.

Instead, a field-administered test of reaction time, judgment, and coordination could be a vastly better indicator of driver impairment and driving ability.  It can be administered with a laptop computer, as law-enforcement officers usually have in their cars, or by a custom device.  Not only would it detect impairment, irrespective of what intoxicant was used, but would also get aged or unhealthy drivers off the road.  It makes little difference whether a driver is impaired due to drug use or because of serious illnesses or age-related degeneration.

AuntieBS

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180225184123.htm

Who the hell are they to decide what’s safe or not?  Sure, if a gun is left where a child could get hold of it, that’s clearly unsafe.  But in an adult-only household, where a woman may have been raped, the gun readily available at her bedside is probably the safest thing she can do.

Imagine hearing a window break, or a door open, and footsteps in the house, particularly if you live in a high crime area.  You may not have time to put on your glasses, hope the battery is still good, and unlock your safe or find the key to unlock your trigger lock.  You may only have seconds to act.   Reaching for your bedside drawer where a loaded handgun is kept may save your life, and these armchair “scientists” say that’s not safe?  When it’s just you living there? When the ability to act quickly is a helluva lot safer than being the victim of a home invader.

This article is nothing more than Marxist sensationalism designed to sway public opinion against gun owners and is otherwise meaningless.  Had they considered who lives in the house (i.e., children), they type of neighborhood, past history, expected response time to a 911 call, and other factors, it might be valid, but as written, this is BULLSHIT.

Responsible gun ownership is certainly paramount, but that responsibility also includes where and how their gun is stored.  Many gun owners have been practicing safe and responsible gun handling and ownership for decades, and could WRITE the curriculum for a gun safety class, not to mention pass it blindfolded, but because they have not attended a class does not make them unsafe.  The bottom line is that responsible gun ownership should be up to the individual, and failures should be handled harshly, not mere slaps on the wrist.  Put the focus on where it should be:  RESPONSIBILITY, and leave the details to the person.

Remember:  When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

Auntie BS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180215153923.htm

This paper cites the need for more, controlled research into medical cannabis uses and no one would argue that, but their usage and conclusions are questionable.  First, for pain relief, cannabis has an interesting property.  It only reduces pain slightly, but renders the patient not caring about it, thus making the pain more tolerable.  Unrealistic expectations also can interfere with analgesic properties.  Given cannabis’ sedative effects, it is often best used at night, when opiates would wear off, waking the patient, while cannabis lasts the night through.  Cannabis should be administered orally for a longer, time-release, effect, with 1-3 hours (2 typ) allowed before effects begin.

Further, some of the pain relief may be through defacto hypnosis, since cannabis can be considered a hypnotic drug, and therefore be heavily modulated by the patient’s mindset.  Inexperienced patients may feel anxiety, thereby rendering cannabis less effective for pain and sleep.

It is important for the prescribing physician to determine the patient’s familiarity and experience with cannabis before prescribing, as such patients often know subjectively how well it works for them.  Novice patients need be counseled on what cannabis does and does not do, with sufficient disclaimers so as to not give unrealistic expectations.  “This may make it easier for you to sleep through the pain and you might experience a bit of dizziness if you get up at night”, would be appropriate advice.  Note that pain is not mentioned.  “If you wake and still notice pain, you may find it diminishing and becoming more tolerable as you drift off to sleep” is another bit of good advice.  Perhaps all the analgesic properties are due to self hypnosis, induced by the drug, so much more research is needed, but the subjective insistence as to its effectiveness should not be dismissed.

AuntieBS

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180212112005.htm

More scare tactics brought to you by Big Pharma.  Again, BFD.  The headline could just as well read “Risk of fatal traffic crash higher during annual Cinco de Mayo celebration” or “Risk of fatal traffic crash higher during annual 4th of July weekend”, or “Risk of fatal traffic crash higher during annual New Year’s Eve”.  Get the picture?  ANY celebratory event which customarily includes intoxicants invariably leads to more accidents.  Duh.

I have a feeling that these recent scare articles are preparing us for a renewed onslaught by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who seems much more concerned with ruining the lives of happy stoners and elderly medical cannabis users, than he is with the rampant white collar crime in Washington, D.C.

The entire UBC scare article can be summarized:  “Don’t drive buzzed”.  Period.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180212125804.htm

The same tired argument that cannabis today is much stronger.  BFD.  Vodka is stronger than beer, so what?  You don’t chug vodka in the same quantities as beer, and you don’t smoke joints of 25% THC cannabis like you did the stuff back in 1975.  People who smoke cannabis– the new, improved, extra-strength, as-seen-on-TV stuff– usually take one or two tokes and enjoy the same mild high that required smoking an entire joint of harsh, throat-burning, cough-inducing, foul-smelling weed fifty years ago.

Also, the article states that “Schizophrenia and other psychiatric issues may be triggered by marijuana use”.  Well, milk can cause weight gain in sedentary individuals.  So what?  Those same psychiatric issues might be triggered by violence on television, alcohol, or even cold medicine.  That’s like saying “car accidents can be caused by drunk driving”.  Anyone with half a brain (the good half, of course) should avoid street drugs if they might have an adverse effect.  Tell us something we DON’T know.

This is just a typical scare-tactics foist on us by Big Pharma, in the same vein as “Exercise can cause asthma attacks in susceptible individuals”, or “Consuming dairy products by lactose-intolerant individuals can cause cramping and flatulence.”  Yes, this JAOA article is mostly flatulence; lots of noise with little matter.

 

AuntieBS

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/11/171113123639.htm

Reading this would lead a naive reader to be horrified at the implications.  But, consider:  If the sky didn’t fall with 16% daily cannabis use, why would it at 19%?  What percentage use alcohol daily?  Caffeine?  It’s all in the BFD category– useless studies, useless results, useless consequences.

And what about people using it to medicate– perhaps in lieu of opiates.  Is that a bad thing?  Is it worse than a couple of beers or glasses of wine?

AuntieBS

Getting spanked as a child can lead to a host of mental health problems in adulthood, say researchers.

Source: Childhood spankings can lead to adult mental health problems — ScienceDaily

 

Fairly administered corporal punishment does not lead to problems in adulthood and may actually minimize them.  The authors are mistaken and confusing it for other confounders as being causal.  Corporal punishment teaches responsibility and that there are painful consequences for making poor choices; something that is lacking in large segments of western society.

Corporal punishment, however, can be doled it in anger, unfairly, abusively and if so, it is these aspects that may contribute to resentment and mental health problems later in life, and it is unclear as to how the authors differentiated that from parental discipline that is so key to teaching responsibility.

Children have not fully developed rational thought processes so, to be effective, punishment and reward must strike at the emotional level.  The fear and pain of a spanking is a sharp lesson in consequences for inappropriate behavior whereas logic and reasoning is largely lost on undeveloped minds.

AuntieBS