Archive for the ‘drugs’ Category

newatlas.com/australian-cannabis-chronic-pain-study/55298/

I have first hand knowledge that this is untrue and was likely funded by Big Pharma to cast doubt about a plant that can reduce opiate use and promote sleep, not to mention that CBD is one of the most powerful anti-inflammatory drugs available.  The blatant lies to get funding from Big Pharma just amaze me– scientists selling out the truth for money!

AuntieBS

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180518102757.htm

The point here is that it is not the cannabis that is causal, but the determinant lies with the teen.  A young teen willing to defy laws and experiment with drugs suggests an unhealthy background– impoverished, ghetto, violence, lack of good parenting, and so on.  The cannabis just happens to be there and was the focus of this study.  Had the study been broader in scope, it would likely reveal experimenting with alcohol and prescription drugs as well.  So, this has much less to do with cannabis than with social norms, defiance, and other sub-ideal environments for the young.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180501085137.htm

Study shows up to 65 percent of older adults who use medical marijuana significantly reduced their chronic pain and dependence on opioid painkillers

I am aware of people who ate cannabis (~20-30g THC) in lieu of taking opiates when recovering from joint replacement surgeries.  They all touted longer relief (sleeping the night through instead of waking in pain and needing more opiates), as well as less constipation that opiates cause.  Most only used the cannabis at night, while continuing opiates during the day, but several ate more cannabis in the mornings, essentially getting up to 12 hours relief from a single edible dose.  A serendipitous side effect was that the cannabinoids also sped bone and nerve healing.

Another segment of the elderly population use ointments containing cannabis for relief from arthritis pain in their hands.  One used it on the lower back with success, while others got insufficient relief, possibly due to fatty tissues between the ointment and joints.

We truly need to de-schedule cannabis so that researchers can determine the plethora of health benefits from its use.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180424160233.htm

I have long been an advocate of a direct test for coordination, judgment, and reaction time, instead of the current cannabis metabolite test being used in some areas to determine whether or not a driver is stoned.  The problem with this test is that cannabis metabolites can remain in a person’s blood for a month after usage has stopped, and is a very poor indicator of the driver’s state of mind.

Instead, a field-administered test of reaction time, judgment, and coordination could be a vastly better indicator of driver impairment and driving ability.  It can be administered with a laptop computer, as law-enforcement officers usually have in their cars, or by a custom device.  Not only would it detect impairment, irrespective of what intoxicant was used, but would also get aged or unhealthy drivers off the road.  It makes little difference whether a driver is impaired due to drug use or because of serious illnesses or age-related degeneration.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180207090111.htm

Just guessing, I would assume that heroin addicts would augment their highs with strong cannabis doses, thereby using less opiate (stretching it for lower cost, longer availability) and thereby having fewer overdoses.  Medical cannabis is more often sold in stronger concentrates and infused candy for a more time-released effect, than is typically available in legal recreational cannabis markets.

Cannabis users that concurrently use alcohol, generally smoke less cannabis and drink less alcohol, than either alone.  Why would not the same relationship occur between those using cannabis and heroin, concurrently?

AuntieBS

Survey: Many Medical Cannabis Patients Cease Using Opioids

Thursday, 16 November 2017

Medical Marijuana Less OpioidsChicago, IL: More than two out of three medical marijuana patients substitute cannabis in place of opioids, according to survey data compiled by Aclara Research, a Chicago-based consulting firm.

Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported that they ceased their opioid use after initiating cannabis therapy. Twenty-nine percent of respondents said that cannabis allowed them to decrease their use of opioids.

The findings are similar to those of prior surveys concluding that patients who use cannabis therapeutically typically reduce or cease their use of opioids and other prescription pharmaceuticals.

According to an October 21 academic paper published on SSRN.com, the enactment of medical marijuana access laws is associated with a $2.47 decrease in per person prescribed opioid spending among those between the ages of 18 and 39. Previous studies – such as those herehere, and here – have drawn similar conclusions.

On November 1, members of President Trump’s opioid commission rejected the notion that cannabis access is associated with reduced rates of opioid abuse and mortality. By contrast, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse acknowledges that available studies “cumulatively suggest that medical marijuana products may have a role in reducing the use of opioids.”

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.

A pre-clinical study reports that the use of the positive allosteric modulator GAT211 enhances the effect of pain-relief chemicals produced by the body in response to stress or injury. The research is a promising step forward in the search for pain relief methods without the addictive side effects of opioids.

Source: Pre-clinical study suggests path toward non-addictive painkillers: Researchers use a compound with a novel mechanism to treat pain in mice without tolerance or physical dependence — ScienceDaily