Archive for the ‘edibles’ Category

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190211083204.htm

A seventy year old man, without cannabis experience, ate 90mg THC, or about 3-10 times the normal dosage, depending upon his body weight.  So, he got seriously buzzed and freaked out.  Panic attack!  It was THAT that caused tachycardia and likely constrictions in blood flow due to adrenaline and panic.  That’s all.  It’s disingenuous to declare the cannabis as causal, even though it indirectly may be.  The point is that cannabis does not cause cardiovascular problems, but panic attacks apparently do.  What if the guy saw something on television that freaked him out and caused a panic attack?  Would these “researchers” declare television to be dangerous to patients with cardiovascular disease?  Only if they had a hidden agenda.

Cannabis is generally relaxing, but blood pressure can be slightly raised while under its effects.  Research shows that cannabis is a vasodilator, if anything, so it should be beneficial to cardiovascular patients.  This paper implies otherwise, but did correctly state: “The patient’s cardiac event was likely triggered by unexpected strain on his body from anxiety and fearful hallucinations caused by the unusually large amount of THC he ingested. His sympathetic nervous system was stimulated, causing increased cardiac output with tachycardia, hypertension, and catecholamine (stress hormone) release. After the psychotropic effects of the drug wore off, and his hallucinations ended, his chest pain stopped.”  [emphasis mine]

So, this really has nothing to do with cannabis, but is about fear/panic, which could be caused by many different subjective experiences.  What if the man had eaten peanuts with dinner– would the researcher’s declare that he had a peanut allergy?  Remember– “correlation is not causality”.  Further, the paper talked about “…since the THC content of the substance had increased significantly from three percent to 12 percent.”  This meme is common to BULLSHIT papers which tout the “danger from increased potency cannabis”.  Increased potency simply means that less is needed.  Just as you don’t drink vodka by the pint, like you do beer, you don’t smoke an entire joint like people did 50 years ago.  One or two hits usually suffices, just like a shot of vodka, not a liter.  So, anytime the “increased potency” meme is used, it discredits the paper’s authors because it indicates either extreme naivete’ or an anti-cannabis agenda.

AuntieBS

Advertisements

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180910173731.htm

Very effective medication for many conditions.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180501085137.htm

Study shows up to 65 percent of older adults who use medical marijuana significantly reduced their chronic pain and dependence on opioid painkillers

I am aware of people who ate cannabis (~20-30g THC) in lieu of taking opiates when recovering from joint replacement surgeries.  They all touted longer relief (sleeping the night through instead of waking in pain and needing more opiates), as well as less constipation that opiates cause.  Most only used the cannabis at night, while continuing opiates during the day, but several ate more cannabis in the mornings, essentially getting up to 12 hours relief from a single edible dose.  A serendipitous side effect was that the cannabinoids also sped bone and nerve healing.

Another segment of the elderly population use ointments containing cannabis for relief from arthritis pain in their hands.  One used it on the lower back with success, while others got insufficient relief, possibly due to fatty tissues between the ointment and joints.

We truly need to de-schedule cannabis so that researchers can determine the plethora of health benefits from its use.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180416085927.htm

Puh-leeze.  “However, the AASM has concluded that sleep apnea should be excluded from the list of chronic medical conditions for state medical cannabis programs due to unreliable delivery methods and insufficient evidence of treatment effectiveness, tolerability and safety.”  What a crock-o-shit.  Unreliable delivery methods?  What is unreliable about eating a given amount of THC?  I know of many who have self-medicated for pain, sleep, etc, very reliably by ingesting cannabis chocolate containing 10-30 mg THC, about two hours before expecting the desired effect.  True, tolerance quickly builds and within a month or two of daily ingestion like that, the dosage can be quadruple the virgin dose, but a month of abstinence restores the initial sensitivity just fine.  How can researchers not know this?

Evidence of treatment can be determined almost immediately, through a respiration monitor, even if subjective.  Safety is well known and tolerability can also be subjectively determined, but starting with low doses until the patient is acclimated and not fearful.

The tone of this paper smacks of Big Pharma, trying to cast fear, uncertainty, and doubt about a plant product which doesn’t generate obscene revenue for the pharmaceutical corporation.  They would much rather sell you a much more dangerous, less-effective pill, than to admit that a plant is not only safe but can be even more effective.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180215153923.htm

This paper cites the need for more, controlled research into medical cannabis uses and no one would argue that, but their usage and conclusions are questionable.  First, for pain relief, cannabis has an interesting property.  It only reduces pain slightly, but renders the patient not caring about it, thus making the pain more tolerable.  Unrealistic expectations also can interfere with analgesic properties.  Given cannabis’ sedative effects, it is often best used at night, when opiates would wear off, waking the patient, while cannabis lasts the night through.  Cannabis should be administered orally for a longer, time-release, effect, with 1-3 hours (2 typ) allowed before effects begin.

Further, some of the pain relief may be through defacto hypnosis, since cannabis can be considered a hypnotic drug, and therefore be heavily modulated by the patient’s mindset.  Inexperienced patients may feel anxiety, thereby rendering cannabis less effective for pain and sleep.

It is important for the prescribing physician to determine the patient’s familiarity and experience with cannabis before prescribing, as such patients often know subjectively how well it works for them.  Novice patients need be counseled on what cannabis does and does not do, with sufficient disclaimers so as to not give unrealistic expectations.  “This may make it easier for you to sleep through the pain and you might experience a bit of dizziness if you get up at night”, would be appropriate advice.  Note that pain is not mentioned.  “If you wake and still notice pain, you may find it diminishing and becoming more tolerable as you drift off to sleep” is another bit of good advice.  Perhaps all the analgesic properties are due to self hypnosis, induced by the drug, so much more research is needed, but the subjective insistence as to its effectiveness should not be dismissed.

AuntieBS

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180207090111.htm

Just guessing, I would assume that heroin addicts would augment their highs with strong cannabis doses, thereby using less opiate (stretching it for lower cost, longer availability) and thereby having fewer overdoses.  Medical cannabis is more often sold in stronger concentrates and infused candy for a more time-released effect, than is typically available in legal recreational cannabis markets.

Cannabis users that concurrently use alcohol, generally smoke less cannabis and drink less alcohol, than either alone.  Why would not the same relationship occur between those using cannabis and heroin, concurrently?

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171212092100.htm

While smoking cannabis may be how researchers tested, or noted, the efficacy, eating cannabis provides a more even, time-release, and may therefore be a better alternative to smoking, which spikes blood content of the cannabinoids quickly, followed by a faster decline.

It may also help Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients, too.

 

AuntieBS