Archive for the ‘Pain Relief’ Category

newatlas.com/australian-cannabis-chronic-pain-study/55298/

I have first hand knowledge that this is untrue and was likely funded by Big Pharma to cast doubt about a plant that can reduce opiate use and promote sleep, not to mention that CBD is one of the most powerful anti-inflammatory drugs available.  The blatant lies to get funding from Big Pharma just amaze me– scientists selling out the truth for money!

AuntieBS

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180501085137.htm

Study shows up to 65 percent of older adults who use medical marijuana significantly reduced their chronic pain and dependence on opioid painkillers

I am aware of people who ate cannabis (~20-30g THC) in lieu of taking opiates when recovering from joint replacement surgeries.  They all touted longer relief (sleeping the night through instead of waking in pain and needing more opiates), as well as less constipation that opiates cause.  Most only used the cannabis at night, while continuing opiates during the day, but several ate more cannabis in the mornings, essentially getting up to 12 hours relief from a single edible dose.  A serendipitous side effect was that the cannabinoids also sped bone and nerve healing.

Another segment of the elderly population use ointments containing cannabis for relief from arthritis pain in their hands.  One used it on the lower back with success, while others got insufficient relief, possibly due to fatty tissues between the ointment and joints.

We truly need to de-schedule cannabis so that researchers can determine the plethora of health benefits from its use.

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180215153923.htm

This paper cites the need for more, controlled research into medical cannabis uses and no one would argue that, but their usage and conclusions are questionable.  First, for pain relief, cannabis has an interesting property.  It only reduces pain slightly, but renders the patient not caring about it, thus making the pain more tolerable.  Unrealistic expectations also can interfere with analgesic properties.  Given cannabis’ sedative effects, it is often best used at night, when opiates would wear off, waking the patient, while cannabis lasts the night through.  Cannabis should be administered orally for a longer, time-release, effect, with 1-3 hours (2 typ) allowed before effects begin.

Further, some of the pain relief may be through defacto hypnosis, since cannabis can be considered a hypnotic drug, and therefore be heavily modulated by the patient’s mindset.  Inexperienced patients may feel anxiety, thereby rendering cannabis less effective for pain and sleep.

It is important for the prescribing physician to determine the patient’s familiarity and experience with cannabis before prescribing, as such patients often know subjectively how well it works for them.  Novice patients need be counseled on what cannabis does and does not do, with sufficient disclaimers so as to not give unrealistic expectations.  “This may make it easier for you to sleep through the pain and you might experience a bit of dizziness if you get up at night”, would be appropriate advice.  Note that pain is not mentioned.  “If you wake and still notice pain, you may find it diminishing and becoming more tolerable as you drift off to sleep” is another bit of good advice.  Perhaps all the analgesic properties are due to self hypnosis, induced by the drug, so much more research is needed, but the subjective insistence as to its effectiveness should not be dismissed.

AuntieBS

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180207090111.htm

Just guessing, I would assume that heroin addicts would augment their highs with strong cannabis doses, thereby using less opiate (stretching it for lower cost, longer availability) and thereby having fewer overdoses.  Medical cannabis is more often sold in stronger concentrates and infused candy for a more time-released effect, than is typically available in legal recreational cannabis markets.

Cannabis users that concurrently use alcohol, generally smoke less cannabis and drink less alcohol, than either alone.  Why would not the same relationship occur between those using cannabis and heroin, concurrently?

AuntieBS

Survey: Many Medical Cannabis Patients Cease Using Opioids

Thursday, 16 November 2017

Medical Marijuana Less OpioidsChicago, IL: More than two out of three medical marijuana patients substitute cannabis in place of opioids, according to survey data compiled by Aclara Research, a Chicago-based consulting firm.

Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported that they ceased their opioid use after initiating cannabis therapy. Twenty-nine percent of respondents said that cannabis allowed them to decrease their use of opioids.

The findings are similar to those of prior surveys concluding that patients who use cannabis therapeutically typically reduce or cease their use of opioids and other prescription pharmaceuticals.

According to an October 21 academic paper published on SSRN.com, the enactment of medical marijuana access laws is associated with a $2.47 decrease in per person prescribed opioid spending among those between the ages of 18 and 39. Previous studies – such as those herehere, and here – have drawn similar conclusions.

On November 1, members of President Trump’s opioid commission rejected the notion that cannabis access is associated with reduced rates of opioid abuse and mortality. By contrast, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse acknowledges that available studies “cumulatively suggest that medical marijuana products may have a role in reducing the use of opioids.”

For more information, contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org.

A pre-clinical study reports that the use of the positive allosteric modulator GAT211 enhances the effect of pain-relief chemicals produced by the body in response to stress or injury. The research is a promising step forward in the search for pain relief methods without the addictive side effects of opioids.

Source: Pre-clinical study suggests path toward non-addictive painkillers: Researchers use a compound with a novel mechanism to treat pain in mice without tolerance or physical dependence — ScienceDaily

More than 130,000 Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) surgeries take place each year with the majority of patients not requiring pain medication after three months post-operatively. However, researchers have found that those patients who were filling opioid prescriptions prior to surgery were 10 times more likely to be filling prescriptions five months after surgery.

Source: Patients taking opioids prior to ACL surgery more likely to be on pain medications longer — ScienceDaily

 

That brilliance could be read, “Patients who have lower thresholds of pain and/or more extensive ACL damage,  are more likely to use opiates longer”.  Well, DUH!  Where is the causality?  Are people in greater pain more likely to take opiates before surgery, as well as for longer after?  This may be the causal factor vs the implication that if we withhold pain relief until after surgery, it will toughen people to do without pain relief quicker.  Puh-lease.  They are not determining the causal factor here.  Bad study.

AuntieBS