Posts Tagged ‘pain relief’

Researchers recently solved a major gap in scientific literature by using mobile software technology to measure the real-time effects of actual cannabis-based products used by millions of people every day.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190226112353.htm

 

AuntieBS

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181024163625.htm

This is good news for pain sufferers who need pain relief but do not want to be high.

 

AuntieBS

 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180919111454.htm

 

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180905161942.htm

 

AuntieBS

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180215153923.htm

This paper cites the need for more, controlled research into medical cannabis uses and no one would argue that, but their usage and conclusions are questionable.  First, for pain relief, cannabis has an interesting property.  It only reduces pain slightly, but renders the patient not caring about it, thus making the pain more tolerable.  Unrealistic expectations also can interfere with analgesic properties.  Given cannabis’ sedative effects, it is often best used at night, when opiates would wear off, waking the patient, while cannabis lasts the night through.  Cannabis should be administered orally for a longer, time-release, effect, with 1-3 hours (2 typ) allowed before effects begin.

Further, some of the pain relief may be through defacto hypnosis, since cannabis can be considered a hypnotic drug, and therefore be heavily modulated by the patient’s mindset.  Inexperienced patients may feel anxiety, thereby rendering cannabis less effective for pain and sleep.

It is important for the prescribing physician to determine the patient’s familiarity and experience with cannabis before prescribing, as such patients often know subjectively how well it works for them.  Novice patients need be counseled on what cannabis does and does not do, with sufficient disclaimers so as to not give unrealistic expectations.  “This may make it easier for you to sleep through the pain and you might experience a bit of dizziness if you get up at night”, would be appropriate advice.  Note that pain is not mentioned.  “If you wake and still notice pain, you may find it diminishing and becoming more tolerable as you drift off to sleep” is another bit of good advice.  Perhaps all the analgesic properties are due to self hypnosis, induced by the drug, so much more research is needed, but the subjective insistence as to its effectiveness should not be dismissed.

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A pre-clinical study reports that the use of the positive allosteric modulator GAT211 enhances the effect of pain-relief chemicals produced by the body in response to stress or injury. The research is a promising step forward in the search for pain relief methods without the addictive side effects of opioids.

Source: Pre-clinical study suggests path toward non-addictive painkillers: Researchers use a compound with a novel mechanism to treat pain in mice without tolerance or physical dependence — ScienceDaily

New research suggests an avenue for developing treatments for chronic pain that harness the medicinal properties of cannabis while minimizing the threat of addiction. Therapeutics that target the endocannabinoid system might produce pain relief with fewer side effects compared with opioids.

Source: Cannabis: Non-addictive pathway to pain relief? Medicinal properties of cannabis examined — ScienceDaily